Cheese Buldak aka Fire Chicken

Cheese Buldak.  Literally “Fire Chicken,” this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Fiery Perfection.

One night, as I was scrolling through my Instagram feed, I saw the most delicious looking dish that I wanted to eat RIGHT AT THAT MOMENT. It was some kind of red, spicy looking dish smothered with cheese. As I clicked “like,” I read my friend’s caption. She was craving Korean food but didn’t want to go out so whipped up this dish at home. #cheesebuldak

WHAT?!? MY THAI FRIEND MADE AND ATE A KOREAN DISH THAT I’VE NEVER HEARD OF MUCH LESS EATEN BEFORE?!?!?

I’m Korean American, by the way. I grew up in the States. I suffered through bad perms (Koreans love perms, I don’t know why) and lived in a house wherewe took off our shoes at the door and ate rice and kimchi with every meal. Our backyard had a clothing rack with dried fish hanging from it. Yeah, we were that family.

All to say, I loved Korean food and Iknew how to cook Korean food. Why hadn’t I heard of this dish before?

I quickly googled “Cheese Buldak” and was shocked to discover that it actually existed. It was one of those modern Korean dishes with street food origins. Buldak – literally “Fire Chicken” – is renowned for its intense spiciness.

When I tried to make it in my own kitchen, I couldn’t find one that was spicy enough. From all the descriptions that I’d read, I wanted all that deep Korean flavor PLUS all that mouth-burning spice!!

Today, Cheese Buldak has became one of my favorite dishes. For when I’m craving spicy. For when friends come over for dinner. Or for whenever I want a satisfying, deeply flavored, saucy, cheesy dish!! Now, it can be yours, too.

PIN FOR LATER:

How to Make Cheese Buldak:

Step 1: Marinate the Chicken.

Step 2:  Make the “fire” sauce.  Basically, whiz sauce ingredients in a food processor until it looks like very spicy baby food.   

Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.
Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.

Step 3:  Brown the chicken:  in batches, one layer at a time, making sure not to overcrowd the pan.

Step 4:  Coat the chicken in “fire” sauce.  Cook until the sauce is reduced and somewhat thick. 

Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.
Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.

Step 5:  Add Korean rice cakes (dduk).  Smother with cheese and bake until melted and gooey. 

Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.
Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.
Literally "Fire Chicken," this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.

Ingredients:

I’ve included both Gochukaru (Korean red chile flakes/powder) and Gochujang (Korean red chili paste) in this recipe. These are staples in any Korean kitchen. Using both adds so much depth of flavor and spice!

For the Gochukaru (flakes), buy the smallest size bag that’s made in Korea of produced/exported by a Korean company. Put a small amount in a glass jar for every use and store in your pantry. Keep the rest and store in the freezer indefinitely. That’s where it keeps best.

jar of Korean gochukaru

For the Gochujang (paste), buy a small jar/box and it will keep for a very long time in the fridge.  Although not indefinitely, probably a year or two. 

Although some would be aghast at this statement, it doesn’t really matter what brand.  Any kind will do, as long as it’s made by a Korean company.  I usually buy what’s on sale.  

tub of Gochujang on cutting board

Asian pear is a crisp, delicious cross between an apple and pear.  They are round, about the size of a grapefruit, and covered with thick yellow skin.

asian pear on white table

Also, the Korean rice cake (dduk/tteok) is completely optional. I happen to love dduk, which is a pantry staple in my kitchen. I store dduk/tteok in the freezer. Both sliced Rice Cake and Round/Tubular Rice Cakes work. If it’s frozen,make sure to soak in cold water for at least 20 minutes.

Scotch Bonnet Peppers. For this recipe, I tried all kinds of spicy peppers to determine which tasted best: jalapenos, Thai bird chilis, Scotch Bonnet Peppers, Fresno peppers, and even different combinations of each. Scotch Bonnet Peppers with the seeds were my favorite.

This recipe is SPICY: 2 Scotch Bonnet Peppers with the seeds. 3 Tbsp Gokucharu. 2 Tbsp Gochujang.  Please adjust according to your own taste!! For me, it’s the perfect burning-in-your-mouth level of spiciness. For my husband, he prefers only 1 pepper (vs 2).

CHEESE. There is nothing sadder than making Cheese Buldak and overcooking the cheese.I experimented with all kinds of methods and do you know what worked best? A slow, gentle melt.

Watch the skillet in the ovencarefully. You don’t want to miss that moment of sheer delight when the cheese pulls away from your spoon and you have to gobble it up before it falls on the table.

Once you start making this dish, you won’t be able to stop!  Cheese Buldak aka Fire Chicken Addiction!!  I love this dish so much!  Enjoy!!

Cheese Buldak aka Korean Fire Chicken

Literally “Fire Chicken,” this South Korean street dish will make your mouth burn. Cheese Buldak is rich, intensely spicy, and smothered in gooey cheese. Spicy Perfection.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Dinner, Lunch
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: Cheese Buldak, chicken
Servings: 4
Author: The Subversive Table | Lis Lam

Equipment

  • 10 or 12 inch cast iron skillet

Ingredients

Chicken Marinade

  • 3 lbs boneless, skinless chicken thighs cut into 1-inch long strips
  • 3 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp Mirin or rice wine
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp neutral oil

Fire Sauce

  • 3 garlic cloves peeled
  • 1/2 large onion roughly chopped
  • 1/2 large Asian pear peeled, cored, roughly chopped
  • 2 Scotch Bonnet Peppers stemmed (keep the seeds), or to taste
  • 3 Tbsp Gochukaru (Korean red chili flakes)
  • 2 Tbsp Gochujang (Korean red chili paste)
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp sugar

Additional

  • 1 cup Rice Cakes (dduk)
  • 2 cups grated mozzarella loosely packed (about 8 oz)
  • 12 inch Cast Iron Skillet

Instructions

  • Place rice cakes into small bowl and cover with cold water, if frozen. Set aside.
  • Combine Marinade ingredients in large bowl.  Mix with spoon.  Add chicken.  Mix again until  well combined.  Cover and place in refrigerator.  
    (Let marinate at least 1 hour, but preferably overnight.)  
    marinated chicken in stainless steel bowl
  • Place Fire Sauce ingredients in food processor. Whiz until pureed. Set aside.
    pureed spicy sauce in food processor for cheese buldak
  • Heat 10 or 12-inch cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add about 1 Tbsp of oil to coat the bottom of the pan. When the oil shimmers, brown the chicken: in batches, one layer at a time, making sure not to crowd the pan. It's ok if the chicken is not fully cooked.
    Transfer to a clean plate. Repeat process until all the chicken is cooked.
    browned chicken in cast iron skillet
  • Place all browned chicken back into the skillet. Pour the Fire Sauce on top. Mix around with a wooden spoon until chicken is completely coated.
    browned chicken with fire sauce in cast iron skillet
  • Continue cooking unti the sauce becomes dark red, thick, and reduced a bit, about 12-15 minutes on medium-high heat. The chicken and sauce should bubble somewhat vigorously but not burn. Lower heat, if needed. Also, feel free to water if the sauce looks too dry (about 1 Tbsp at a time). Keep an eye on the sauce, mixing it from time to time.
    chicken and spicy sauce in cast iron skillet
  • Remove skillet from heat.  Drain rice cakes and scatter over the chicken and fire sauce mixture.  
    chicken, fire sauce, and Korean rice cakes in cast iron pan
  • Sprinkle the cheese on top of the rice cakes and chicken, making sure to coat evenly.
    mozzarella cheese over chicken and spicy sauce
  • Place skillet in 350 F oven until cheese melts, about 5-10 minutes. It should be a gentle melting of cheese. Watch carefully and make sure it doesn't overcook!
    cheese buldak in cast iron pan, close up
  • Remove from oven.  Garnish with sliced green onion and sprinkle of sesame seeds, if desired. Serve immediately and enjoy!
    Korean cheese buldak in cast iron pan, close up

Notes

*If you don’t own a cast iron skillet, you can also cook all the components in a regular skillet and transfer to a baking dish after the chicken has cooked in the sauce. Then, add the rice cakes (dduk) and cheese. Bake in the oven, as per usual.
**When browning the chicken, you may need to add more oil depending on your cast iron skillet. My cast iron skillet is well seasoned after years of use so 1 Tbsp was perfect.

More Korean Food Inspiration:

Kimchi Stew aka Kimchi Jjigae. The best way to use up old kimchi and a one-pot meal to boot.

black pot of kimchi stew (kimchi jjigae)

Gochujang Chicken Drumsticks. A spicy-sweet, easy-to-love favorite.

Gochujang chicken drumsticks on parchment paper and sheet pan

Beef Bulgogi. The classic that everyone knows and loves.

Bulgogi on a plate

Korean Fried Chicken. Lip smackin’ good. The most popular recipe on the blog for a reason.

Korean Fried Chicken, platter
All Recipes, Chicken, Dinner with Friends, Gochujang, Korean, Main

5 Comments

  1. Made this for lunch and love it! What an amazing combination of taste, texture, east, west, and the addition of rice cake!

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