Fluffy Korean Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)

Difficulty Easy

Soft and fluffy Korean Steamed Eggs, also known as Gyeran Jjim. Make this classic and popular Korean side dish in only 15 minutes! Enjoy the fluffy texture and savory, addictive flavor. A universally adored Korean recipe that’s extremely versatile. And easy to make!

What is Gyeran Jjim or Korean Steamed Egg?

Gyeran Jjim or Korean Steamed Egg is a popular side dish often served at Korean BBQ restaurants. An easy dish to make at home, it’s basically well-seasoned eggs that are steamed until impossibly light and fluffy.

What makes this Korean dish so special is the cooking process. To make, the eggs are steamed on low heat until they rise like a souffle. Slightly wobbly with an ultra-fluffy, silky texture — Gyeran Jjim is served steaming hot. The first bite is so feathery soft!

Korean Steamed Egg is also a favorite because of the savory, incredibly delicious flavor. To season, traditional recipes call for anchovy broth, fish sauce, or fermented shrimp. A savory combination that is truly epic. Better than salt, the briny, seafood flavor adds depth and body to the eggs. And it does not taste fishy at all.

Korean home cooks also add other pantry items to enhance the flavor: a pinch of Gochukaru (Korean chili flakes), a drizzle of sesame oil, and finely minced green onion.

But feel free to mix it up with other pantry items that taste good with eggs. My current favorite combo includes minced chilies and a slice of Kraft cheese that melts into gooey deliciousness. Or add a drizzle of Chili Oil. YUM!

There’s nothing so good as these fluffy steamed eggs — light as air, dramatically puffy, and full of addictively savory, umami flavor!

korean steamed egg in earthenware pot

Ingredients:

I’ve made this simple egg dish so many times. It always tastes good! Feel free to change up the seasoning. I’ve included variations below.

  • Eggs. The main ingredient. I recommend organic, free-run large eggs for best flavor, color, and volume.
  • Broth. For the best flavor, use broth. Anchovy stock is Korean soup stock flavored with anchovies and Kombu. Dashi is Japanese soup stock flavored with dried tuna flakes. They are both ideal since they add salty, briny flavor. Chicken stock or vegetable stock is also good. In a pinch, water can also be used. *FYI I often use instant anchovy bouillon or Hondashi (instant dashi powder) because it’s easier and more convenient. They can be found at Korean grocery stores.
  • Fish Sauce OR Sauwoojut (fermented salted shrimp). To flavor and season the eggs. Use either Fish sauce or Sauwoojut (fermented salted shrimp) for deep, umami-rich, salty flavor. If you don’t have either, use salt or soy sauce.
  • Gochukaru. Korean dried chili flakes. A pinch adds color and flavor without too much spice.
  • Green onion. Adds color and light onion flavor. A classic flavoring in Korean cuisine!
  • Sesame oil. Adds aromatic richness.
  • Sesame seeds. For nutty flavor and texture.
Ingredients for Korean Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)

Instructions:

  1. Whisk. Crack eggs into a bowl. Whisk well with a fork or wire whisk until smooth with no lumps. Add either the fish sauce or salted, fermented shrimp (Sauwoojut). Add a pinch of gochukaru, green onion, and sesame oil. Add anchovy stock and whisk again.
  2. Cook. Add whisked eggs to a small earthenware pot. Turn on the oven to medium-high heat. Whiile the pot heats up, stir the eggs slowly with a spoon. Stir until large curds form, similar to scrambled eggs. When the eggs are 80% cooked, cover and lower to medium-low heat. Steam until fluffy and cooked through, about 6-6 minutes.
  3. Serve. Remove lid. The eggs should be Garnish with sesame seed, more green onion and enjoy!

PRO Tips:

  • Whisk eggs well. No lumps or clumps whatsoever! Some people recommend pushing the whisked eggs through a fine mesh sieve but a good whisk works just as well.
  • Use a Korean earthenware pot. A clay pot will keep the steamed eggs hot for a longer period. The extra heat will create more volume than a regular pot. And ensure the eggs do not deflate as quickly.
  • Garnish quickly. Prepare your garnish ahead of time to serve as quickly as possible!

Tips for EXTRA FLUFFY Gyeran Jjim:

  • The larger the egg curds, the fluffier the final result! Stir slowly to form large curds. They provide the necessary structure for the eggs to reach maximum height and volume. Be patient! It will feel slow in the beginning.
  • Choose the right size pot! The egg mixture should fill up most of the cooking vessel — about 80-90% of the pot. The pot must be full to achieve a visually pleasing “over-the-brim” appearance as it steams. If the egg mixture only fills 50% of the pot, it won’t reach the brim when steamed.
  • Cover with a bowl. Allows for maximum volume and rise. A regular lid will squash and flatten the eggs.

Note: Although a sky-high, extra-fluffy Gyeran Jjim is very pretty and visually pleasing — the clean up can be rather messy. Water droplets and bits of egg will bubble up and dribble over the sides. If you don’t enjoy the clean-up, use a larger cooking vessel.

Variations:

Eggs are wonderfully versatile and pair well with a number of other ingredients. Over the years, I’ve experimented with many non-traditional additions. Some of my favorites for Korean Steamed Eggs include:

  • Chili pepper. Finely minced chilies add so much flavor and spice! Thai, Fresno, green or red, and Jalapeno all taste great.
  • Shrimp. Roughly chop into bite-sized pieces for tender nuggets of shrimpy goodness.
  • Shitake Mushrooms. For earthy, woodsy flavor.
  • Chili Oil. A generous drizzle tastes good with eggs of any kind.
  • Mince or Ground Pork. Makes the dish more meaty and porky.
  • Cheese. Kraft processed cheese slices or shredded Mozarella or Cheddar cheese add so much flavor.
  • Cilantro. Adds aromatic freshness. Especially good with shrimp + shitake mushrooms.
  • Perilla Leaves. Finely chopped leaves add earthy, woodsy freshness.
korean steamed egg (gyeran jjim) in earthenware bowl

FAQ:

Do I need a Korean clay pot (Ttukbaegi) to cook this dish?

No, you do not need a clay pot or Korean earthenware bowl to make this dish! Ttukbaegi or clay pots are frequently used because they retain heat well. The additional heat prevents the eggs from deflating and keeps the eggs fluffy and bouncy for longer. Ttukbaegi Gyeran Jjim also makes it easy to transfer from stovetop to table.

If you don’t have an earthenware bowl, use a small saucepan instead. Stainless steel or non-stick (teflon or ceramic) pots all work. The method is the same. FYI the cook time will be faster because clay pots take a long time to heat up. Also, it will deflate faster, too.

Can I use water instead of broth?

Yes, water can be used instead of broth. In fact, I make this easy egg recipe with water about 50% of the time.

When using water, you’ll need to compensate by adding a little more fish sauce or saewoojut (fermented shrimp paste) to the eggs.

Help! Why do my eggs keep burning?

If your eggs keep burning, lower the heat. It will take more time but a slow, long cook on low heat will ensure minimal burning.

Some browning on the bottom and sides of the pot is normal. As long as it doesn’t taste bitter or affect the final taste, that’s ok.

Please note: Every stovetop is different. Over the years, I’ve found that burner size greatly affects the final outcome. Some burners heat faster and stronger than others. You may need to experiment in your kitchen. If one particular burner results in burned eggs, try a different one.

How do I eat/serve Gyeran Jjim?

Korean Steamed Eggs are typically eaten as banchan — one of many side dishes. Add rice and a few sides for a shared, communal meal.

For an individual, 1-person serving, make a smaller portion. And enjoy with rice and kimchi for a quick and delicious meal. (I’ve included both portion sizes in the recipe card below).

Other easy recipes:

korean steamed egg (gyeran jjim) in ttukbaegi

Fluffy Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim)

The Subversive Table | Lis Lam
Soft and fluffy Korean Steamed Eggs, also known as Gyeran Jjim. Make this classic and popular Korean side dish in only 15 minutes! Enjoy the fluffy texture and savory, addictive flavor. A universally adored Korean recipe that's extremely versatile. And easy to make!
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Course Side
Cuisine Korean
Servings 2
Calories 113 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 Ttukbaegi or Korean clay pot (small size, 500ml)

Ingredients
  

For 2-3 servings:

  • 5 large eggs (organic, free run)
  • 1 cup broth (anchovy, vegetable, chicken, or dashi) can be subbed with water
  • 2 tsp fish sauce (or 1 tsp sauwoojut fermented shrimp)
  • 2 green onion (minced)
  • 1 pinch Gochukaru

For 1 serving:

  • 3 large eggs (organic, free run
  • 1/2 cup broth (anchovy, vegetable, chicken or dashi) can be subbed with water
  • 1 tsp fish sauce (or 1/2 tsp sauwoojut fermented shrimp)
  • 1 green onion (minced)
  • 1 pinch Gochukaru

Instructions
 

  • In a medium bowl, whisk eggs very well until smooth and runny.
  • Add fish sauce, green onion, and pinch of Gochukaru. Add broth or water. Whisk again to combine.
  • Heat a small Ttukbaegi (clay pot) over medium high heat. Immediately add the egg mixture. Stir slowly with a large spoon, making sure to scrape the bottom and sides. Keep stirring until large curds form, similar to scrambled eggs, about 3-4 minutes.
  • When the eggs are 80-90% cooked, cover and adjust heat to low. Steam on low heat until puffy and cooked through, about 2-4 minutes.
  • Remove lid and quickly garnish with sesame oil, sesame seeds, and little green onion. Enjoy with rice and banchan (side dishes) of choice!

Video

Notes

To make it extra fluffy:
  • The larger the egg curds, the fluffier the final result! Stir slowly to form large curds. They provide the necessary structure for the eggs to reach maximum height and volume. Be patient! It will feel slow in the beginning.
  • Choose the right size pot! The egg mixture should fill 80-90% of the pot. If the egg mixture only fills 50% of the pot, it won’t reach the brim when steamed. A smaller allowance between egg mixture and pot size will yield a visually pleasing “over-the-brim” appearance.
  • Cover with bowl. Allows for maximum volume and rise. A regular lid will squash and flatten the eggs.
  • Use a clay pot. Its ability to retain heat makes Gyeran Jjim extra fluffy.

Nutrition

Calories: 113kcalCarbohydrates: 2gProtein: 10gFat: 7gSaturated Fat: 2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0.03gCholesterol: 279mgSodium: 579mgPotassium: 130mgFiber: 0.2gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 605IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 48mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Gyeran Jjim, Korean, Steamed Egg
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15 minutes, All Recipes, Breakfast + Brunch, Korean, Side, Snacks, Weeknight Meals

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